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Who fucking cares?

Do people really care about Banksy? I mean who cares who they are. Let them be. 

dontwannasaygoodbye:

genjigirl:

Best scene ever

I cried during this part

retrogasm:

1976 Weebles Haunted House… they wobble but they don’t fall down.

retrogasm:

1976 Weebles Haunted House… they wobble but they don’t fall down.

-teesa-:

9.4.14

Michael Che speaks to Jim Gilchrist, president of the Minuteman Project, about the “invasion” of immigrant children.

Spin

Swingtime at the Lawn on D

muchanimal-veryfeminism-wow:

fauxcyborg:

justhuey:

fauxcyborg:

street harassment stems from the view that the public still belongs to men and women are enroaching on their territory when we exist outside of the home

Surely you would have empirical evidence to back such a claim?

Engaging with an anti-feminist is like, always futile but would the Harvard Law Review suffice as an acceptable source? The journal article has a few other sources as footnotes.

image

I said, “The only way I can play someone this hard is for something to be peeled away each week, and the first thing that needs to go is the wig.” I just wanted to deal with her hair. It’s a big thing with African-American women…You start when you’re just a young girl. Do you twist it? Do you leave it natural when it’s so hard to take care of? Then you start wearing wigs but every night before bed you’ve got to take the wig off and deal with your hair underneath. And it’s a part of Annalise that I needed the writers to deal with because I’ve never seen it, ever, on TV and I thought it would be very powerful. It’s part of her mask. - Viola Davis (x)

"She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful." (x)

Sometimes, it’s easier to tell a stranger something very personal. It`s like there’s less risk, opening yourself up to someone who doesn’t know you.
Linwood Barclay (via hplyrikz)

cinemove:

The Breakfast Club (1985) dir. John Hughes

Saturday, March 24, 1984. Shermer High School, Shermer, Illinois, 60062.

Jeneil Williams, Herieth Paul, Ajak Deng, Riley Montana, Kai Newman, and Tosh Bellington photographed by Richard Burbridge, W Magazine November 2014  

For as long as there’s been a mainstream feminist movement, there have been corporations eager to capitalize on women’s desire for empowerment. And simply saying men and women should be treated equally isn’t the slightest bit risky in an era when the economy demands that nearly all women work outside the home and the biggest pop stars in America embrace the term feminist. But empowerment conferences are less a product of this friendly brand of modern feminism than they are the result of changing media business models and the rise of superficial corporate do-gooderism. Consumers are so wary of traditional advertising that one of the only ways for brands to make an end-run around skepticism is to claim, “Hey, we’re doing some good here.” As Unilever has learned with all the free press its “body-positive” Dove ads have gotten, women’s empowerment is a great theme for conscientious advertising — Bitch Magazine co-founder Andi Zeisler calls it “empowertising.” You-go-girl ads appeal to a broad demographic, but unlike championing, say, stricter environmental regulation, they put the onus for change on women themselves, not corporations or society.